Kylie November 9th and 10th, Nazis invaded many

Kylie PickettMs. Fischer English IIJanuary 12, 2018 Kristallnacht Kristallnacht is german for Crystal night or better known as The Night of the Broken Glass. Kristallnacht is the night that many jews began to fear the German Nazis. On this night in time, violence against the jews broke out across the Reich. This event wasn’t planned to an extent. On November 7, 1938 a Jewish teen, Herschel Grynszpan, assassinated the German diplomat Ernst Vom Rath. Do to this unexplained act of violence German propaganda minister, Joseph Goebbels gave a anti-semitic speech to the Nazis. Two days after the speech, on November 9th and 10th, Nazis invaded many Jewish towns and cities in Nazi Germany and in Austria. Once they invaded the cities, the Nazis and German civilians started destroying many Jewish houses, businesses and their houses of worship. They also looted and trashed Jewish cemeteries, hospitals and schools. In all there were over one thousand synagogues burnt to the ground. There were also over seven thousand Jewish businesses and houses destroyed and looted that night. All the while, the police and the fire brigades just stood there and watched. Dozens and dozens of people died that night and even more were basically sentenced to death because, over 30,000 German Jewish men were arrested for the “crime” of being Jewish and sent to concentration camps, where hundreds of them perished. In the immediate aftermath of Kristallnacht, the streets of Jewish communities were littered with broken glass from vandalized buildings, giving rise to the name Night of Broken Glass. Along with all the men that were arrested, many Jewish women were put in local jails. In the weeks that followed, the German government promulgated dozens of laws and decrees designed to deprive Jews of their property and of their means of livelihood. If men that weren’t incarcerated still wanted to be apart of their business it would have had to be ran by a Non-Jewish man.As a result of all the damage that had been done to the many businesses, houses and synagogues in the towns and cities, the Jews were fined over Four-hundred million U.S dollars (at 1938 rates) for all the damages that the Jews were supposedly “guilty” for by the German Government. There was also a curfew that was placed on the Jews that limited the amount of hours they got to leave their houses. To go along with the drop of a curfew on the Jews, life became more difficult for the Jewish youth. Jews were already banned from going into museums, public playgrounds, and swimming pools, now they are also banned from the public schools. The Nazi government banned Jews from schools on November 15, 1938.The Jew were treated by the Germans in the same way whites treated blacks back in the day, just like they nothing but a pile of gum on the bottom of your shoe. The Jews were now treated like nothing by the German Nazis, so the Nazis figured that they shouldn’t get the right to a proper education by following out their college careers.The violence that occured on the Jews, of the two night period that many know as Kristallnacht served as a wake-up call to all Jews that this “hell” wasn’t going to end any time soon. After the realization that this wasn’t going to end in the near future, many Jews decided that this isn’t the way they would prefer to live their lives for many more years to come. Many decided to leave what they called home and find a new place that was safer. “The “Night of Broken Glass”.” United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum,www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007697. History.com Staff. “Kristallnacht.” History.com, A&E Television Networks, 2009, www.history.com/topics/kristallnacht.Berenbaum, Michael. “Kristallnacht.” Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica, inc., 15 May 2017, www.britannica.com/event/Kristallnacht.”Kristallnacht.” United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005201.