The ‘Nothing’s changed’ expresses his anger towards racist,

The poems “Nothing’s Changed” by Tatamkhulu Afrika and “Vultures” by Chinua Achebe both tells a story about racism. Both poets wanted to express their displeasures under the injustice and cruel society led by racists. Tatamkhulu Afrika talks about the rampant apartheid system in District Six and scrutinizes the racism. Chinua Achebe talks about his considerations of the coexistence of evil and love through comparison of evil vultures and Nazi commandant.The poems “Nothing’s Changed” by Tatamkhulu Afrika and “Vultures” by Chinua Achebe both tell a story about racism. Both poets wanted to express their displeasures under the injustice and cruel society led by racists. Tatamkhulu Afrika talks about the rampant apartheid system in District Six and scrutinizes the racism. Chinua Achebe talks about his considerations of the coexistence of evil and love through comparison of evil vultures and Nazi commandant.Tatamkhulu Afrika describes what life was like in District Six near Cape Town in South Africa while apartheid was in place. He returned to his hometown, and he expected to see some changes on racial problems, but nothing seems to be changed. The ironic title ‘Nothing’s changed’ expresses his anger towards racist, especially the whites. Apartheid is the separation of the whites and the nonwhites, and Afrika was not pleased back at his time. He started off the poem with descriptions of his home, such as ‘small round hard stone’, ‘seeding grass’ and amiable weeds’ making the poem more lively. Then uses onomatopoeia words such as ‘click’ and ‘crunch’ to show how he was irritated and angered by the destroyed district six. In stanza two he started with ‘District Six’ with a full stop changing the tone and emphasize the importance of this place. All the bad memories and black people being separated by whites all come into his mind. As he started to use repetition of ‘and.., and..,’ and..,’ he is revealing his anger towards the racists. Afrika brings the readers to the restaurant in stanza three, he described the restaurant with ‘brash with glass’, ‘haute cuisine’ and ‘guard at the gatepost’ to show the separation of whites and nonwhites. Afrika uses a contrast between the prosperity of the whites and the poorness of the nonwhites through details of the restaurants. The restaurant for whites has a sign of ‘whites only inn’, it was placed outside of the restaurant and it was meant for the blacks to see, the sign clearly shows that the blacks are not allowed, and the whites need the guard to protect them against ‘the coloreds’. Revealing the feeling of unfairness and racism. ‘No signs say it is: but we all know where we belong.’ the poet wrote that between two stanzas. The sign of apartheid may have been eliminated, but the poet knows that the nonwhites would still not be welcome in the restaurant. The poet looked into the whites restaurant in stanza five. By using the words ‘white glass’ and ‘linen’, it helped to show how good the restaurant was, and emphasizing the ‘whiteness’. ‘The single rose’ maybe a symbol, the color of rose is red, and red is the color of blood, it symbolizes how the blacks were struggling during the time, people bleed for their freedom. The restaurant for blacks in stanza six is another example of racism. The poet used ‘Working man’s cafe sells bunny chows’, ‘plastic table’ and ‘wipe your fingers on your jeans’ to show the clear difference between whites and nonwhites, how the restaurants were different. Afrika becomes a ‘boy again’ in the last stanza, stating that he wants to throw a ‘stone’ or ‘bomb’ to the grass, expressing his anger toward the racist society. Because in his eyes, nothing’s changed.Afrika also made a contrast between the ‘incipient Port Jackson trees’ and ‘tall, purple-flowering, amiable weed’. The poet describes the weeds as friendly and harmless plants but it doesn’t change the fact that it is still weed, so it has to be cut off. Representing the nonwhites are being driven out. On the other hand, the Port Jackson trees are not originally from South Africa, so the trees are interpreting a meaning that the whites have started taking over.’Vultures’ is a dark poem that focuses on the racism that happens in the concentration camp in Belsen, uses vulture as symbol. The poem is divided into four sections each of them includes short lines. As there are punctuations which forces the readers to start thinking about the evilness of mankind and how people could be treated differently just because of their skin color and race. The poem begins with imagery, two vile vultures nestle close to each other and then feasting on a corpse. The poet shows that love could exist in unexpected places where no one would think possible. Chinua Achebe uses the disgusting and appalling vultures that consumes dead corpse to express his strong feelings for the hatred and evil in mankind that is described in the poem. In the first stanza, he started off with dark and dull words like ‘greyness’, ‘broken bone’ and ‘dead tree’. He also uses alliteration ‘drizzle of one despondent dawn’ to help emphasize the cold feeling that the poet is trying to achieve. In the second stanza, he contrasts love and death using ‘charnel-house’, a place where corpses are placed in, the existence of love could still be seen in there. He uses personification on love itself, ‘her face turned to the wall’ love couldn’t take a look at the evil and racist things contained within. This could also relate to what happened to those people who were gunned just because of their race, turning their faces to the wall, accepting the cruel fate. The third stanza is about the Commandant at Belsen Camp, the poet constructed the commandant’s character in this stanza. Achebe then describes his toward the commandant in the concentration camp, he showed ‘love’ by ‘pick up a chocolate for his tender offspring’ after a day of burning human corpses. The smell of the Commandant was described as “human roast” considering the corpses smell that way. Those people died because they were Jews, they were gassed and their bodies were burnt. This helped to link the two poems together as the concentration camp and racism of apartheid both have unnecessary racist acts towards different colored people, and people with different race. Achebe thought that evil people may feel love, however, their love is not enough to be forgiven after the evil things they’ve done. The final stanza shows that even an ‘ogre’ like the Commandant could have soft sides. He then described the Commandant’s humanity as a “tiny glow worm” and said that it is ‘encapsulated in icy caverns of a cruel heart’, suggesting that his warmth is trapped. It gives a strong image of humanity could be get rid of. He ended the stanza with ‘perpetually of evil’, suggesting evil is never ending, just like racism it is still happening.Achebe is upset by those who take part of the apartheid, he despises racism and he thinks that even if evil people did some kind acts, it won’t stop them from committing something worse.The structure of both poems is very different from each other. ‘Vultures’ is written in free verse which has different lengths of lines, it helped with creating the horror of mankind and racism. ‘Nothing’s Changed’ has its title repeated at the end of the poem again. This helps to convey a message about the existence of racism, even though apartheid has ended, racism still exists in modern societies. Nothing’s Changed is more like a description of the poet himself, introducing his life back at district six to the readers, but ‘vultures’ is a descriptive poem, describing the evilness of mankind and the awfulness of racism. However, both poets are aiming for the readers to understand racism was harming the society, tons of people were killed and no one was trying to stop it from happening. They both convey a saddening and negative view on the civilization, using different ways, both carry the same powerful and shocking message.